Experience
Thursday, December 18, 2014
ExperienceWhat's NewTimelineExhibitsGallery19th Hole

Arnold Palmer News: Archives

« February 2006 | Main | April 2006 »

March 29, 2006

PALMER TO DINE WITH FELLOW MASTERS CHAMPIONS

His string of consecutive playing appearances in the Masters Tournament ended at 50 when he competed for a final time in the 2004 championship, but Arnold Palmer will be in Augusta, Georgia, again this April, a stop he has made every year since he and his late wife, Winnie, arrived there in their car and trailer in 1955 for his first one.

As he did last year, Palmer will go to Augusta Tuesday, April 4, to attend the Champions dinner that evening in the historic Augusta National clubhouse. Tiger Woods, the defending champion, hosts the dinner, at which virtually all of the living former winners of the classic event, playing or non-playing, will gather. As tradition dictates, Augusta National Chairman William (Hootie) Johnson will be the only non-champion on hand.

Interestingly, Palmer and Woods each hold four Masters titles, trailing only Jack Nicklaus with his six championships in the history of the 73-year-old tournament, established in 1934 by the legendary Bob Jones and his close friend and confidante, Clifford Roberts.

Palmer expects to visit with his many friends among his fellow members Wednesday before departing the scene and returning to his home base at Bay Hill in Orlando.

He still recalls with pleasure his first trip to Augusta for the tournament. He and Winnie had traveled the PGA’s Winter Tour in two different trailers – a way of life they jettisoned weeks later when they returned to their home in Latrobe, Pennsylvania – and had yet to score his first professional victory. He received his invitation to the Masters that year as the current U.S. Amateur Champion.

The Palmers parked in a location near Daniel Field, Augusta’s non-commercial airport, where little more than a decade later, they would be landing in the first of the jets which he has owned and piloted ever since.

As for Palmer’s playing plans this year, his first tournament start may be in the Senior PGA Championship the last full week of May at Oak Tree Country Club in Edmond, Oklahoma. He won that championship twice in Florida – at Turnberry Isle Country Club in North Miami in 1980 and PGA National Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens in 1984. The 1980 win was his first as a senior.

Posted by dgiffin at 12:50 PM

March 22, 2006

Disaster Decided the 2006 Outcome

Disaster decided the outcome again the very next year. Just when he seemed to have the victory secured, Englishman Greg Owen shockingly three-putted the 71st green from near tap-in range for a double bogey. That brought Rod Pampling back into a tie and he won with his par as Owen bunkered his approach and bogeyed the 72nd hole. It was an unexpected blessing for the 36-year-old Australian, who had carried a four-stroke lead into the final round. Pampling, just the second overseas winner in the tournament’s 28-year history, closed with a 72 and was 14-under-par with his 274 total.

Neither player was in close range the first day, as Bart Bryant and Dean Wilson shot 66s, a stroke in front of former Bay Hill winners Ernie Els and Chad Campbell, Ben Curtis, Lucas Glover and Jason Gore. Pampling entered the picture Friday when he shot 65, the day’s low round, for 135 and, with Robert Allenby, trailed Glover (67-67) by one stroke. Pampling, who had only two previous victories during his 12-year international career, surged into his four-stroke lead Saturday when he birdied two of the last three holes for 67—202. Owen was at 206 with Glover (72) and Northern Ireland’s Darren Clarke, who tied the tournament record with his nine-under-par 63.

Owen took full advantage after Pampling faltered with an out-of-bounds drive at the 13th hole Sunday. Owen went a stroke ahead with his sixth birdie of the day at the 16th and had a two-shot lead when Pampling bogeyed the 17th before Owen missed a 40-inch par putt and, too hastily, a shorter one coming back to give Pampling the new life he needed to grab the victory.

Posted by scurry at 04:23 PM

March 16, 2006

It's Arnie's Place in Name and Spirit

PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem confirmed that the Bay Hill Invitational will be renamed after this week to become the Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard.

"We are particularly excited about this development for the future of the tournament here at Bay Hill," Finchem said. "Arnold, of course, is inextricably related to this championship. He created it. He and Jack Nicklaus created the PGA Tour; I often say, if it wasn't for Arnold, I wouldn't have a job."

Palmer founded the Bay Hill Invitational 27 years ago, when it was named the Bay Hill Citrus Classic. Under Palmer's guidance, the tournamenthas evolved into one of the Tour's premier events.

The name change occured after a suggestion by Palmer's daughter, Amy Saunders. Finchem concurred and made the change official. Importantly, I think what's happened here with the development of the tournament under Arnold's tutelage is very special," Finchem said. "It is one of those things that's a part of the texture and the fabric of the PGA Tour."

The name change is, in a word, a formality as Palmer has been the overseer of the tournament since he moved the event across Orlando from Rio Pinar to the Bay Hill Club in 1979.

"If it can be what I had hoped this tournament would be over the years, I'll be very happy for it," Palmer said.

When asked if we can expecct his comeback in the first-ever Arnold Palmer Invitational, Palmer responded, "I won't have any problem with that at all. I can promise you that. So it's pretty easy for me to say I will not miss trying to play."

Regarding his opinion of the condition of the course for this year's event, Palmer put it bluntly, "I suppose that the bottom line for our purposes is that the golf course is the best this year that it has ever been."

Players will notice that the rough is precariously deep, but the fairways are not narrower from regular member play. Palmer has allowed the rough to grow to 3 1/2 inches, topping it off last Sunday. It will not be mowed throughout the tournament. According to Palmer, the greens and fairways have responded to off-season treatments very well and the length of the golf course is unchanged. The greens will be running "a modest 11 or 12 on the speeds."

"We have kept it muc the same as it has been over the past few years," he said. "We haven't really tried to change the character of the golf course." Palmer takes great care not to trick up his prized golf course, leaving the classic layout alone for the membership, while providing the professionals a demanding challenge.

"Well, I really have to analyze the situation and look at it from all aspects of the game of golf," Palmer said. "One of the things we continually try and do is grow the game, and grow it not for the professionals necessarily, certainly in their interest, but grow the game for the people who go out and play the game and enjoy playing it."

So far, Palmer's plan for Bay Hill has worked even though the average driving distance on the Tour has risen over the past few years with the advancement of equipment technology.

"Last year, I was very happy with the consistency of how the golf course was treated by these long hitter, 12-under-par," he said. "If we can keep in that area, that doesn't change much in 50 years; it's still running around the same number."

Bob Byman won the first Bay Hill tournament with a 278 total in 1979.

It's a delicate balance, but one Palmer pays close attention.

"So I have to look at it from the point of view that I love the game and I don't want to ruin it for the guys who go out and shoot 80 or 85," He said. "I want them to be able to enjoy it and I want them to feel like they can go out and improve their games just like the professionals can improve theirs."

The game is in good hands with Palmer and renaming the tournament will remind us all of that.

Posted by scurry at 08:32 AM

Tiger Woods on the Arnold Palmer Invitational

"I think it's a title that it certainly deserves, he deserves it after what Arnold has meant to not only our game of golf here in the United States but around the world. It's certainly something that I think has been long overdue," Tiger Woods said.

Posted by scurry at 07:52 AM

Els Echos Palmer's Sentiments

Arnold Palmer indicated he wants the rough as difficult as ever this week to force players to become more accurate off the tee.

"I agree with Arnold," Ernie Els said. "We play the tour, the tour should be on a different level than you guys play on Saturday, Sunday mornings."

He agrees with Palmer's assesment of hitting it long and accurate in order to score.

"If you hit the ball a long way, you should be reasonably accurate, he said. "If you have a 35-40-yards wide fairway we should be good enough to hit it 310 and keep it in the fairway. And that's what we practice for. Not one player on tour has the philosophy of just oging out and hitting it all over the place."

Posted by scurry at 07:48 AM

March 11, 2006

Three the Hard Way - Bay Hill Club & Lodge 17th Hole

17th Hole, 223 Yards, Par 3

Through the years I was never able to persuade my father to take a share of the spotlight he so richly deserved…and now he is gone. Milfred J. (Deacon) Palmer was responsible for getting me started in the right way in sports and life in my formative years.

I remember when I was a little boy, four or five year old, how I would ride on the tractor with him as he mowed the fairways of Latrobe Country Club. Her was the course superintendent at Latrobe for fifty years. We lived right on the course.

When the Depression came, the Club needed a course superintendent more than a gold professional, so the officers made him both. He was the pro for more than forty years. Pap and his men even built the back nine at Latrobe and, in my opinion, it’s a better nine than the front.

When I was filming the television show that led to the writing of this book, I was stuck for a guest as Bay Hill in Orlando, Florida, where I wanted to play the seventieth hole, a par-three that doesn’t have to take a back seat to any in the world.

Bay Hill was designed by the late Dick Wilson, whom I consider the finest of all golf architects. His subtle nuances around the greens catch the most wary player, and he had the ability to lay out a course that utilized every bit of natural terrain.

The seventeenth is a fully carry over the water, with a long, shallow trap guarding the front right two thirds of the green. Bunkers are also well placed to the left and back of the green. The green is wide and fairly shallow, with the toughest pin placements on the right side behind the water and trap. The tees are elevated.

Through the years I was never able to persuade my father to take a share of the spotlight he so richly deserved…and now he is gone. Milfred J. (Deacon) Palmer was responsible for getting me started in the right way in sports and life in my formative years.

I remember when I was a little boy, four or five year old, how I would ride on the tractor with him as he mowed the fairways of Latrobe Country Club. Her was the course superintendent at Latrobe for fifty years. We lived right on the course.

When the Depression came, the Club needed a course superintendent more than a gold professional, so the officers made him both. He was the pro for more than forty years. Pap and his men even built the back nine at Latrobe and, in my opinion, it’s a better nine than the front.

When I was filming the television show that led to the writing of this book, I was stuck for a guest as Bay Hill in Orlando, Florida, where I wanted to play the seventieth hole, a par-three that doesn’t have to take a back seat to any in the world.

Bay Hill was designed by the late Dick Wilson, whom I consider the finest of all golf architects. His subtle nuances around the greens catch the most wary player, and he had the ability to lay out a course that utilized every bit of natural terrain.

The seventeenth is a fully carry over the water, with a long, shallow trap guarding the front right two thirds of the green. Bunkers are also well placed to the left and back of the green. The green is wide and fairly shallow, with the toughest pin placements on the right side behind the water and trap. The tees are elevated.

This hole has fond memories for me. A whole gang of us were playing a rainy-day eightsome and we had all kind of little matches going among us, We came to this hole and I asked my caddy, Tom, what club to hit.

“A three-iron,” Tom replied.

I hit a three-iron and hit it pretty good. It went in the water. I asked Atom what he was doing to me and took a two-iron out of the bag.

“That's too much club,” Tom said. I hit the two-iron, which bounced short of the pin and went in the hole. I looked over at Tom with a smile. “No, suh, Mr. Palmer, you hit that fat,” Tom said, not giving up. “I still say it’s a three-iron.”

All I know is I made three the hard way.

There are also one or two alligators in the lakes at Bay Hill that are often seen sunning themselves. And a female skin diver retrieves the many golf balls hit in the water from time to time.

One day, former Vice President Agnew, who has visited Bay Hill, hit a golf ball in the water. When he walked up to the edge of the hazard, she popped out of the water and handed him his ball. He was astounded.

On the day Pap and I went to play the seventeenth, I think that Deacon was a little nervous.. I tried to relax him but really didn’t have to. He smashed a good three-wood about forty feet from the pin. I’ve never seen a happier expression in my life. I hit a two-iron and was on the green, too, only about eight feet from the cup.

When Pap knocked the putt in for a birdie deuce, you’d think he had been a television star all his life. He calmly walked over, picked the ball out of the hole, and looked at me. “You’re away.” He said. Remarking to myself that “I’d better make mine or I’ll never hear the end of it,” I worked pretty hard on my putt and got it in the cup for my birdie. Still, I was mighty proud of Pap for rising to the occasion as he did.

While Latrobe Country Club was Deacon’s whole life, he came to admire Bay Hill as much as I have since I first played an exhibition match there back in the early 1960s when it was first opened. I had always like that part of Florida, which has the state’s most rolling terrain, many of its lakes, and yet is far enough south to have comfortable golfing weather year ‘round.

I was so attracted to Bay Hill that,. In the mid-1960s, I and a small group of associates began negotiations that led to out purchase of the Club in 1969. It has become my winter home in Florida. My father and mother, Doris, who also had a great influence on my early life, enjoyed spending parts of the winter at Bay Hill. What irony that Pap was at Bay Hill playing golf when he dies February of 1976 shortly after competing a day on the course.

Let me give you another example of how fortunate I was to have such parents when I was a boy. Once I was playing in some kind of a junior tournament in western Pennsylvania and hadn’t yet learned to curb my youthful temper. I was playing badly and throwing an occasional club. When it was over and we were in the car heading home, I realized that the atmosphere was decidedly cool. Before long, Pap turned to me and, in no uncertain terms told me: “If you ever throw a club again, I’ll take them away from you. This game is for gentlemen, and gentlemen learn to control themselves.” It was a very important lesson that has been so valuable to me all my life, and I say the same to any youngster, or adult, for that matter, on whom this shoe fits.

Despite its length from the back tee, the seventeenth is not overly difficult for the low handicapper, unless the wind is in his face (it often is.) It’s more a matter of selecting the right club because of the rather shallow depth of the green. Otherwise, he has quite a bit of room to the right or left. Our low man should be on with a long iron or, high handicapper on that championship tee unless you want him to admire the rather spectacular view across the water from that chute.

From the front tee, which reduces the length to about 160 to 170 yards, he can reach the green with a decent long iron or wood, even if he has that usual slice. So long as he maneuvers the shot to avoid the bunkers, he can make the almost flat green and usually muster a par. Even when the pin is to the right behind the water and the long front trap, he is wise to play to the left side, since a sizable apron lies on that side beside the water short of the green. He should be able at least to make a bogey from there.

Our high handicapper might as well take a bucket of balls to that tee and keep swinging with his driver until he gets across. There is really no place for him to lay up-water to the right and several tall pines to the left short of the green that block that route. Maybe the high man ought to take the example of the ‘gators and the skin diver and swim the ball across. Seriously, a bit of such frustration on that hole should convince out high handicapper that if he is going to play the game, he has better improve. He should head for the pro shop and some lessons.

~ Arnold Palmer

Posted by scurry at 11:51 PM

Bay Hill Invitational presented by MasterCard FIGURES TO AGAIN RANK AMONG WORLD’S TOP TEN

The Bay Hill Invitational presented by MasterCard will have the second-strongest field in the world so far this year, and figures to again rank among the world’s top 10 tournaments for 2006 at the year’s end.

The players committed for the PGA Tour event scheduled for Arnold Palmer’s Bay Hill Club for the week of March 13-19 include four of the top five players on the Official World Golf Ranking, nine of the top 15, and 30 of the top 50. So far in 2006, only the Accenture Match Play, one of the World Golf Championship events, has had a stronger field.

In 2005, Bay Hill’s field was the world’s ninth strongest behind only the four major championships, The Players Championship, and the three World Golf Championship events. The same four of the world’s top five players and nine of the top 15 were in the field.

The world’s top four players are entered this year, led by No. 1 Tiger Woods, the champion at Bay Hill for four consecutive years, 2000 through 2003. Then comes Vijay Singh (No. 2 in the world), Retief Goosen (No. 3), and 1998 Bay Hill champion Ernie Els (No. 4). Others from among the top 15 in the world who have entered are Sergio Garcia (No. 6), Jim Furyk (No. 7), Adam Scott (No. 9), 2005 European Order of Merit winner Colin Montgomerie (No. 11), and reigning U. S. Open champion Michael Campbell (No. 15).

Other high-ranking players in the field are 2004 Bay Hill champion Chad Campbell (No. 19), Angel Cabrera (No. 22), Scott Verplank (No. 24), Geoff Ogilvy (No. 25), Jose Maria Olazabal (No. 26), Darren Clarke (No. 27), Stuart Appleby (No. 29), Tom Lehman (No. 31), Bart Bryant (No. 32), Stewart Cink (No. 34), Robert Allenby (No. 35), K. J. Choi (No. 36), Mike Weir (No. 38), Sean O’Hair (No. 40), Lee Westwood (No. 42), Brandt Jobe (No. 44), Zach Johnson (No. 45), John Daly (No. 46), Mark Hensby (No. 48), Lucas Glover (No. 49) and Carl Pettersson (No. 50).


2006 BAY HILL INVITATIONAL PRESENTED BY MASTERCARD

Robert Allenby
Stuart Appleby
Arjun Atwal
Woody Austin
Clint Avret
Paul Azinger
Craig Barlow
Shane Bertsch
Henrik Bjornstad
Jason Bohn
David Branshaw
Jeff Brehaut
Mark Brooks
Bart Bryant
Angel Cabrera
Chad Campbell
Michael Campbell
K. J. Choi
Daniel Chopra
Stewart Cink
Darren Clarke
Ben Curtis
John Daly
Robert Damron
Patrick Damron
Brian Davis
Bubba Dickerson
David Duval
Ernie Els
Nick Faldo
Brad Faxon
Dan Forsman
Carlos Franco
Harrison Frazar
Fred Funk
Jim Furyk
Robert Gamez
Sergio Garcia
Brian Gay
Lucas Glover
Retief Goosen
Jason Gore
Paul Goydos
Nathan Green
Todd Hamilton
J. J. Henry
Mark Hensby
Tim Herron
J. B. Holmes
Charles Howell III
Mike Hulbert
Billy Hurley III
John Huston
Trevor Immelman
Fredrik Jacobson
Brandt Jobe
Zach Johnson
Steve Jones
Jonathon Kaye
Jerry Kelly
Hank Kuehne
Bernhard Langer
Paul Lawrie
Tom Lehman
Peter Lonard
Steve Lowery
Jeff Maggert
Hunter Mahan
Shigeki Maruyama
Len Mattiace
Bob May
Rocco Mediate
Shaun Micheel
Colin Montgomerie
Ryan Moore
Kevin Na
Sean O’Hair
Mark O’Meara
Joe Ogilvie
Geoff Ogilvy
Jose Maria Olazabal
Greg Owen
Ryan Palmer
Rod Pampling
Corey Pavin
Pat Perez
Craig Perks
Tom Pernice Jr.
Tim Petrovic
Carl Pettersson
Ian Poulter
Dicky Pride
Ted Purdy
Tag Ridings
Justin Rose
Sam Saunders
Adam Scott
John Senden
Paul Sheehan
Wes Short Jr.
Webb Simpson
Joey Sindelar
Vijay Singh
Heath Slocum
Jeff Sluman
Kevin Stadler
Vaughn Taylor
Kirk Triplett
Bo Van Pelt
Scott Verplank
Duffy Waldorf
Camilo Villegas
Charles Warren
Nick Watney
Bubba Watson
Mike Weir
Lee Westwood
Dean Wilson
Mark Wilson
Tiger Woods

Total Field -- 120

2006 BAY HILL INVITATIONAL PRESENTED BY MASTERCARD
PRO-AMATEUR FIELD

Appleby, Stuart
Bohn, Jason
Bryant, Bart
Campbell, Chad
Campbell, Michael
Choi, K. J.
Chopra, Daniel
Cink, Stewart
Clarke, Darren
Daly, John
Els, Ernie
Faxon, Brad
Funk, Fred
Furyk, Jim
Garcia, Sergio
Glover, Lucas
Goosen, Retief
Gore, Jason
Herron, Tim
Howell, Charles III
Jobe, Brandt
Johnson, Zach
Kaye, Jonathan
Langer, Bernhard
Lehman, Tom
Lonard, Peter
Maruyama, Shigeki
Micheel, Shaun
Montgomerie, Colin
O’Hair, Sean
O’Meara, Mark
Ogilvy, Geoff
Ogivlie, Joe
Olazabal, Jose Maria
Owen, Greg
Palmer, Arnold
Pampling, Rod
Pavin, Corey
Pernice, Tom Jr.
Petrovic, Tim
Pettersson, Carl
Purdy, Ted
Rose, Justin
Scott, Adam
Sindelar, Joey
Singh, Vijay
Slocum, Heath
Sluman, Jeff
Taylor, Vaughan
Van Pelt, Bo
Verplank, Scott
Weir, Mike
Woods, Tiger

Posted by scurry at 11:45 PM

Bay Hill Event Being Renamed to Honor Arnold Palmer

Will Become Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard in 2007

ORLANDO, FL – PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem announced today that the TOUR’s Bay Hill Invitational presented by MasterCard is changing names after this year to honor its longtime host, World Golf Hall of Famer Arnold Palmer.

Beginning in 2007, the tournament will be known as the Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard. It is held annually at Palmer’s Bay Hill Club.

“We have been discussing the possibility of a name change with Arnold and his family and how it would be an appropriate tribute to one of the game’s all-time great champions and ambassadors,” Finchem explained. “There was a strong sentiment to do this, and in the end we determined that it might as well occur sooner than later, particularly now that Arnold has consciously reduced his competitive playing schedule.

“Arnold has been the face of the tournament for a number of years, and it makes sense that it bears his name to honor his countless contributions to the tournament and to the PGA TOUR.”

“It has been a matter of great pride for me when my name was placed on an entity of one sort or another over the years, but I can’t think of anything that brings me more pleasure and satisfaction than having it on the tournament that has meant so much to me for so long,” Palmer said.

The tournament first was introduced as the Florida Citrus Open Invitational in 1966 at Rio Pinar Country Club in Orlando, before relocating to Bay Hill Club in 1979. Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, which has been serving patients since 1989.

“The tournament name change is certainly most appropriate for the man who has changed the face of the sport over the last 50 years and continues to impact it on a daily basis,” said Tournament Director Scott Wellington. “This will do nothing but provide even greater awareness for our event, our loyal and dedicated sponsors, and Mr. Palmer's hospital and the Orlando community as a whole. We are tremendously excited about the future of the Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard.”

“MasterCard is proud to be associated with Arnold Palmer, a man who has done so much not just for the game of golf but for the Orlando community. We look forward to many more priceless moments both on the course and at the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children,” said Alan Heuer, Chief Operating Officer, MasterCard International.

About the PGA TOUR
The PGA TOUR is a tax-exempt membership organization of professional golfers. Its primary purpose is to provide competitive earnings opportunities for past, current and future members of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour; to protect the integrity of the game; and to help grow the reach of the game in the U.S. and around the world.

In 2006, the three Tours will compete in nearly 120 events for approximately $325 million in prize money. Tournaments will be held in eight countries outside the U.S. and in 38 states.

In addition to providing competitive opportunities for its membership, TOUR events also generate significant funds for local charities. In fact, the three Tours reached the $1 billion mark in overall charitable contributions in late 2005. The PGA TOUR's web site address is www.pgatour.com and the company is headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL.

About MasterCard International
MasterCard Incorporated is a leading global payments solutions company that provides a broad variety of innovative services in support of our global members' credit, deposit access, electronic cash, business-to-business and related payment programs. MasterCard, through its principal operating subsidiary, MasterCard International Incorporated, manages a family of well-known, widely accepted payment card brands including MasterCard®, Maestro® and Cirrus® and serves financial institutions, consumers and businesses in over 210 countries and territories. The MasterCard award-winning Priceless® advertising campaign is now seen in 105 countries and in 48 languages, giving the MasterCard brand a truly global reach and scope. For more information, go to www.mastercardinternational.com.

Posted by scurry at 01:38 PM

March 09, 2006

Bay Hill Invitational presented by MasterCard Benefits the New Winnie Palmer Hospital

The Palmer Family Legacy of Caring Continues

The Palmer family legacy is flourishing as the new Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies opens in 2006, thanks to countless individuals, organizations and companies who have joined in Orlando Regional Healthcare’s mission to improve the health and quality of life of the individuals and communities we serve. As a tribute to Winnie’s many years of dedication, the new hospital for women and babies is named in her honor.

Together, Arnold and Winner Palmer helped form this vision for the hospital, and there is no one who better represents its core values of caring, service and commitment to excellence.

Winnie once wrote, “Nothing is more precious that the life and health of a child. And in many ways no medical challenge is greater than the care of seriously ill or injured children. It’s not simply a matter of treating ‘small adults.’ The care of children, especially infants, requires specialized equipment, expertise, and training.”

The Winnie Palmer Hospital fills a critical need, providing much needed space to meet the demand for labor and delivery services that is outpacing the region’s population growth. In 2005, the Arnold Palmer Hospital delivered more than 11,000 babies – 40 percent of all deliveries in the tri-county area – making it the busiest labor and delivery unit in the state and the third busiest in the nation. It also meets the demand for obstetric, gynecological and pediatric services that has risen for more than a decade.

The new hospital will provide important services for women at every stage of life, contains the capacity to meet future growth, and creates much needed room for the Arnold Palmer Hospital to expand its pediatric services.

The Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies will continue to exemplify the same nurturing, patient-centered philosophy demonstrated every day at the Arnold Palmer Hospital.

The Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies will join the renamed Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and the Howard Phillips Center for Children & Families to comprise the Arnold Palmer Medical Center – a concentration of services focusing on the special needs of children and women in Central Florida and beyond.

Proceeds from the Bay Hill Invitational presented by MasterCard benefit the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and the Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies.

For tickets to the 2006 Bay Hill Invitational presented by MasterCard, or for more information, log on to the tournament web site, www.bayhillinvitational.com, or call the Bay Hill ticket office at 407-876-7774 or toll free at 1-866-764-4843.

Posted by scurry at 11:40 PM

March 01, 2006

SAM SAUNDERS, ARNOLD PALMER'S GRANDSON, TO PLAY IN BAY HILL INVITATIONAL PRESENTED BY MASTERCARD

High School Senior Given Spot in Tournament Field

Eighteen-year-old Sam Saunders has caddied in the Bay Hill tournament for his grandfather.

Twice he has played in final rounds as a marker -- with Peter Jacobsen and Dicky Pride.

This year, Arnold Palmer's grandson, a high school senior and plus-four amateur, will tee it up on Thursday, March 16, as a bonafide member of the championship field of the 2006 Bay Hill Invitational Presented by MasterCard.

Tournament officials extended one of the 20 available special invitations to the BHI to Saunders just days after the son of Roy and Amy Saunders, Palmer’s daughter and son-in-law, won the men’s club championship on the tournament course by 17 strokes. It was the second Bay Hill title for the Trinity Prep student, who plans to pursue his education and golf career at Clemson University.

“Sam has displayed his talent through the past couple of years and this is an opportunity for a young man to get out and get some experience in the game that might not otherwise come his way,” Palmer said. “So, we’ll see how he does with the big boys. I think that will be great.”

Among Saunders’ golfing achievements to date, he won the Florida State High School championship as a junior, was medalist at last year’s USGA Junior Amateur, was local medalist and played in the 2004 U.S. Men’s Amateur at the Winged Foot Club, site of this year’s U.S. Open, and won several national junior events, including the prestigious Sawgrass Invitational. He first won the Bay Hill men’s championship when he was a 15-year-old high school freshman.

Posted by scurry at 07:06 PM

November 2014
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30            

Recent Entries

Monthly Archives